How music and art can be both alive and digital

How music and art can be both alive and digital

What happens when artists and artists-in-residence take on the role of a digital producer?

The latest in a series of essays by The Conversation’s musical instrument designer, Guzheng Liu, will take on music and arts as digital producers in this week’s episode of Next Big Futures.

The series will explore the ways in which music and artistic expression can both thrive and grow in digital environments.

Liu, who previously taught in the Department of Design at the University of Melbourne, will be examining the role that technology plays in musical instrument design and how music and artists are increasingly being co-opted into digital production.

He will be discussing the evolution of digital musical instruments, how the digital production of instruments has impacted the musical experience, and the implications of this on both musicians and the arts.

For this episode, the programme will be hosted by Dr Claire Firth, who is the director of the Institute for Music at the Institute of Music at The Australian National University.

Dr Firth will discuss how the design of music instruments is changing in the digital age and how these changes are shaping how artists use technology to make music and how the technology itself is shaping the way that artists work.

Langdon will also take on his latest work, a series titled The Music of the Dead.

In this new series, Langdon will explore a music and cultural legacy of Chinese music and the history of music in China that has shaped the way artists interact with the world.

This project will explore how Chinese music has been used in a range of cultural contexts, from traditional to digital, including the construction of Buddhist temples and the creation of new forms of music.

The first episode of the series will focus on a recent collaboration between Langdon and musician and author David Kipp.

In the first episode, Langdons music is heard as he sings “Dai Da Di” from the Buddhist epic poem The Golden Ass, which is the first recorded Tibetan song to be recorded in the modern age.

“Dai Di” is the second recorded Tibetan composition to be made available for public listening.

The programme will also examine how Chinese classical music has found new ways to connect with contemporary audiences through the use of digital technologies.

It will look at the impact of music sharing platforms like Bandcamp and Spotify, and how Chinese musicians are adapting traditional instruments in new ways.

The second episode of The Music Of The Dead will examine how the Chinese classical musician Zhuangzi created the modern form of Chinese folk music.

Zhuangzes work is one of the earliest recorded works in Western music, and is now the subject of an exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia.

Lingdon will discuss the influence of classical music in the arts, and whether it is the music itself or its influence on artists and audiences that is the driving force behind the evolution and success of Chinese classical.

In an era of rising global inequality, the arts and arts education are facing an unprecedented threat.

This article was originally published on The Conversation.

Read the original article.

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