The Musical Instruments Saga: How the Beatles Saved Music with Musical Instruments

The Musical Instruments Saga: How the Beatles Saved Music with Musical Instruments

In the fall of 1971, a group of students at the University of Chicago were teaching a musical instrument class.

Their instruments were made of metal and rubber.

The students weren’t sure how they would play, but they knew that they had a new way to play.

A group of young musicians had recently created a new musical instrument, the Kustom-G-20.

The metal and plastic instruments were created in a workshop on the University’s campus.

They were meant to be played with a wooden block.

The student group put a wooden ball on top of the K, and they played their instruments.

It was a momentous moment for the students.

They began to teach their instruments and their students began to see the potential in their instrument.

Students started to play the K-20 on the school’s dance floor.

The K-G20 was the first of what would become an explosion of musical instruments in the 1970s and 1980s.

But why did students at this early stage of the Beatles’ music creation team suddenly want to use metal and bamboo?

What did they think of the new instruments?

How did the KG20 affect the development of the instrument?

And how did it affect the Beatles?

In this series of stories, we explore the history of musical instrument technology, the rise and fall of a musical culture and the impact of the original K-g20 on pop music.

This article originally appeared in the October 2017 issue of VICE magazine.

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